Flickr Photo Album Finally Integrated

I was finally able to integrate the photo album on Flickr into the actual site, thanks to the FAlbum WordPress Plugin released at version .5 by Elijah Cornell. Once again, no brainer to install. All I had to do was modify the falbum-wp.php file to close the extra divs in my theme.

The plugin supports permalinks, tags, and all of the goodies you would expect from a Flickr based photo album.

To see the new photo album, go to http://www.bieberlabs.com/wordpress/photos, or click the photo album item in the menu at the top of the site.

WordPress Plugin: UltimateTagWarrior

I’ve installed the UltimateTagWarrior plugin for WordPress in order to experiment with tagging on the site.

Installation was almost a no-brainer and consisted of unarchiving the downloaded zip file into my plugins directory and activating the plugin. I then messed around with different tag cloud types for the sidebar and wound up settling on the sized cloud. The code in the sidebar looks like this:

That got the tag cloud to display in the sidebar. Rather than go with the default tag editing that comes per post when you have local and technorati tags on in the Admin Manage/Tags screen, I turned them off and added the following code to enable Ajax based tag editing to the blog entries:

And thats it. Tagging is enabled!

Just to be clear, the almost no brainer has nothing to do with the quality of the plugin, but because I was picky as to how I wanted things to work. If you want plain vanilla tagging without Ajax, the default install and adding the code to the sidebar should suffice.

Happy tagging!

WP-DB Backup WordPress Plugin

I just finished installing the WP-DB Backup plugin from skippy.net. This plugin allows you to perform a database backup directly from the WordPress admin screens. It’s pretty nice. It allows you to pick which database tables you would like to backup (after preselecting the core WordPress tables for you) and gives you the option of storing the backup file on the server, downloading it, or having it emailed to you. It also has a nice little progress bar that informs you of the progress of the backup.

This is much better than running my mysqldump command every time I want to take a backup of the server and manually secure copying it down from the server and sourcing it. One or two clicks, and I have my MySQL dump file on my local machine ready to be checked in.

If you’ve been looking for an easier way to backup your database, check this plugin out. It makes the task of backing up your database a lot less of a chore than it otherwise is.

Skippy’s also got a lot of other cool looking plugins on his plugin page. You might want to check them out and see if anything grabs you there.