Practical Subversion – Second Edition

I received a free copy of Practical Subversion, Second Edition by Daniel Berlin and Garrett Rooney on Friday from their publishers, Apress.

I had reviewed the first edition before it was released and had found it to be an excellent companion to “Version Control with Subversion” (C. Michael Pilato, Ben Collins-Sussman, Brian W. Fitzpatrick), mostly due to its coverage of the Subversion API’s – which I had not seen covered in any real depth in any other book.

I have to say, the authors have outdone themselves with the Second Edition. The book is extremely well written for varying levels of Subversion experience. The beginner will find a very easy to understand introduction to using Subversion in the first two chapters, giving a really great tutorial on how to use the tool along with explanations of many of the concepts embodied in the implementation of the tool, such as locking vs. non-locking systems, properties (from file to revision properties), the basic workflow involved in using version control, and how to use the various commands, from checking out, to using svn blame (or ‘praise’ as I learned from the book is an alias for the command) to find the origin of a change in the system.

Thats just the first two chapters. As the book goes on the reader will learn about repository administration, the differences between the BDB and FSFS file systems, using Apache and Apache modules to squeeze additional functionality into the system, migrating from other version control systems such as CVS and Perforce and third party tools that work with Subversion (such as ViewVC, emacs, etc). The book also covers maintaining vendor branches, and contains a very good chapter on Version Control Best Practices. You then have, from my memory anyway, a greatly expanded chapter on using the Subversion API.

Practical Subversion, Second Edition does a really good job of covering information at many skill levels in an extremely accessible way. This book will definitely be one of those that I would put on the shelf at work as we continue to move people into more advanced roles in the management of our repositories – as there’s really nothing the book doesn’t cover.

I’ve been a user of Subversion for a very long time (I think I started around version 0.19 or so) and as I perused the book last night I walked away with some new distinctions about how we were using the tool and changes I could make to make administration and maintenance easier. That says a lot.

Congratulations to Garrett and Daniel on a fine piece of work. Hopefully the next edition will cover some of the newer features of 1.4, specifically the svnsync tool.

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